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Scientists develop quick, low-cost microchip for immune monitoring and clinical applications

March 25, 2017

"The research fully demonstrates real-life clinical use of our revolutionary technology," Ma says.

The next step for the team will be to systematically apply the technology to clinical studies. The researchers have already begun to test the technology in additional patient populations, and to combine the SCBC with existing assays in order to get a more comprehensive picture of a therapy's efficacy.

In fact, the same study that showed the microchip's efficacy is already helping the researchers better evaluate the specific cancer immunotherapy trial, from which the patient in the study was drawn. "We are doing these same types of measurements on similar patients but at a significantly higher level of detail, and at many time points over the course of the cancer immunotherapy procedure," explains Heath. "It is helping us put together a 'movie' of the patient's immune system during the therapy, and it is providing us with some very surprising but also valuable insights into how the therapy works and how we might work with our UCLA colleagues to improve it."

"Application of this technology provides an unprecedented understanding of the human immune system by allowing an efficient and multiplexed functional readout of immune responses using limiting numbers of lymphocytes," says Antoni Ribas, associate professor of medicine and physician who led the clinical trial portion of the study at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Source: California Institute of Technology