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Women smokers more likely to attempt quitting when bans are enforced

July 25, 2017

Only 29 percent of women surveyed reported that their home and workplaces banned smoking completely, but this varied with socioeconomic factors. Smoking bans were in both places for 17 percent of women with less than a high school education, 21 percent of those making less than $25,000 a year and 17 percent of African-American women.

The main goal of smoking bans is to keep people from harm from secondhand smoke, said Bill Blatt, director of tobacco programs at the American Lung Association. Getting smokers to stop smoking is an added benefit of the bans, he added.

It is not surprising that home bans are associated with more quit attempts because both are personal or family decisions, compared to workplace bans that an employee might have no control over, Blatt said. Someone who creates a home smoking ban usually is going to follow through on it, he said.

"Yet, less than one-third of our population of working women smokers reported that they work and live in smoke-free environments," Rose said. "This suggests we have a lot more work to do to make sure that all women have full protection from secondhand smoke at both work and home."

Source Center for Advancing Health